Tag Archives: Same-sex marriage

McCarthy: Pastors, staffers prepared to deal with Supreme Court marriage decision – Illinois Review

McCarthy: Pastors, staffers prepared to deal with Supreme Court marriage decision – Illinois Review.

Frequent commenter to this blog Margaret McCarthy covers  Daniel McConchie, Vice President of Government Affairs for Americans United for Life, in a Grayslake IL presentation, including threats to conscience, including:

Here in Illinois, [where] Holy Family Catholic Church in Inverness is faced with a lawsuit over employment discrimination by Colin Collette because he was fired when he married his male partner.

In Illinois, we have had The “Illinois Right of Conscience” [as] one of the strongest protections for religious objections . . . successfully used to protect a Catholic pharmacist from civil penalty when he refused to supply a customer with abortificient drugs.

Currently, SB 1564 . . . passed and . . . before the General Assembly, would weaken those protections.

Chicago Tribune columnist and blogger Dennis Byrne gave us a look at this book in April as applying to abortion.

As if we weren’t looking, pro-choice forces this week are pushing an anti-conscience abortion bill through the Illinois Legislature.

Illinois Senate Bill 1564, which rewrites theHealth Care Right of Conscience Act, is designed to cripple or shut down  pregnancy resource centers, such asAid for Womenand theWomen’s Center, that offer womenalternatives to abortion.  Ironically, the bill reduces choices for women and takes direct aim at health care providers whose conscience (whether religiously inspired or for logical reasons) does not allow them to participate in abortions.

That means that workers atpregnancy crisis centers would have to violate their conscience by describing the “benefits” of abortion and refer clients to abortion clinics.

The bill is presumed also to cover same-sex confrontations, McCarthy reports:

For several years, the homosexual lobby has been aggressively seeking out businesses whose owners refused on religious grounds to provide services for their prospective weddings. When refused, the couples sued, citing discrimination based on already existing laws permitting gay marriage. 

McConchie cited numerous cases across the country of florists, caterers, wedding chapels, bakers that were singled out for attack.  Some were defended successfully, others were fined and/or put out of business.

McConchie was blunt about it, warning his Christ Church “Crossroads” audience, “You may not be interested in politics, but if you don’t pay attention, politics will roll over you.”

Did Archbishop Cupich blow an opportunity to defend traditional marriage?

Phil Lawler, of Catholic World News, thinks so.

A contributor to the Chicago Sun-Times reports that he had a friendly exchange with Archbishop Blaise Cupich on the topic of same-sex marriage, and reproduces large chunks of that exchange for his readers. Naturally the archbishop says that he does not support legal recognition of same-sex marriage. Yet columnist Neil Steinberg observes: “To me, everything the archbishop said, except for his conclusions, is an argument for gay marriage.”

That sounds absurd, doesn’t it? Yet if you read the entire column you may find yourself hard-pressed to cite evidence proving Steinberg wrong.

The archbishop “thinks” this or that, sounding an uncertain trumpet. Timid.

Later (much later): It’s not his job in such a case to say what he thinks but as teacher and upholder of Catholic doctrine (a little-used reference by all but traditionalist thinkers), he should telling us what’s what, authoritatively.

Luckless in New Mexico

You have this Christian quirk about gay marriage. Hey, you were practically born with it.You become a latter-day Bartleby the Scrivener(apologies to Herman Melville, wherever he is, and if there’s a heavenly niche for great writers, that’s probably his location).That is, you’d prefer not to be the photographer at a gay wedding.You do not intend to interfere with the gay ceremony.

You will not call out from the congregation your objection when the minister or judge asks, if he or she does, whether anyone has an objection to the procedure.

You will not (let’s say, anyhow) write a letter to your local editor or, God forbid, blog the matter.

You just, like Bartleby, prefer not, for your quirky Christian reasons, to be the photographer.

What’s more, you reside and work in New Mexico. 

Wherefore:

Buster, you are out of luck.

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